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Monday, 16 August 2010 18:40

Early Childhood Education

Students develop necessary skills to become educators and caregivers for infants, toddlers, and preschool aged children.  ECE students assist in Northeast’s on-site preschool, as well as in early childhood learning centers in the community. ECE students develop skills to foster appropriate social relationships among the preschoolers and guiding them as they learn through play. Students successfully completing the ECE program become State Certified Preschool Teachers.

Sample Job Titles: 

  • Preschool Teachers
  • Nannies
  • Infant Toddler Teachers

 Technical and Higher Education Majors: 

  • Early Childhood Education Tracks
  • Child Development Related Fields
  • Administrators:  Preschool and Children's Centers

College and University Programs:

  • Salem State University
  • Wheelock College
  • Bay State College
  • Lesley University
  • Middlesex Community College

Early Childhood graduates have been employed by:

  •  KinderCare, Stoneham, MA
  •  Creative Corner, Winchester, MA
  •  First Steps, Stoneham, MA
  • Chime Time, Melrose, MA
  •  Little Steps, Melrose, MA

Certifications and Career Advancement:  Massachusetts requires child care centers, including those in private homes, to be licensed. In order to obtain their license, child care centers require Early Childhood Educators to pass a background check and get immunizations. Early Childhood Educators need to be trained in first aid and CPR, and continue their professional development on topics of health and safety.   As Early Childhood Educators  gain experience, some may advance to supervisory or administrative positions in large child care centers or preschools. Often, these positions require additional training, such as a bachelors or masters degree.  Preschool teachers may advance from teacher of one classroom to a lead teacher, who is responsible for the instruction of several classes.   Career opportunity exists for lead teachers to move up to being the director of the center. Early Childhood Educators with a Masters degree, and appropriate licensure, are qualified to teach kindergarten through grade 2. Teaching at these higher grades often results in higher pay.

 CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION

 Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA

Industry Certifications available in High School: 

  • Childcare Education Institute Online Safety Program Certification
  • American Heart Association CPR, AED, First Aid
  • MA Department Early Education and Care: PreSchool Teacher Cerification
  • MA Department Early Education and Care: Infant and Toddler Teacher Cerification (additional)
College Credits toward post-secondary certifications/degrees can be earned through Articulation Agreements with:
College  Course
MA State EC Articulation Agreement One or more EC courses at a MA community college
North Shore Community College ECE120  -  Intro to Child Development   3 credits

EARLY CHILDARE:  COURSE OF STUDY

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY – COURSE #ECX      1.4 CREDITS     Students participate in hands-on activities introduced to the field of Early Childhood Education and receive exposure to safety topicsinside/outside the preschool environment.

GRADE 9 SHOP – COURSE #ECXF-16      4 CREDITS     Students are actively engaged in the daily activities of the preschool. They are supported in initiating appropriate conversations with the preschool children and assuming an active role in their play. Students are expected to follow shop rules and safety practices as outlined by the preschool and State guidelines.

GRADE 10 SHOP – COURSE #EC2      20 CREDITS    Students are introduced to planning and implementing daily activities under the supervision of head teachers. The sophomore curriculum includes lesson planning, introduction to careers in Early Childhood Education, and the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of preschool aged children. Students learn how to appropriately talk to children and impart age appropriate behavior management techniques. Grade 10 ECE students gain an understanding of the importance of learning through play in all areas of the preschool curriculum and develop teamwork skills by working closely with Grade 12 students. Students will also prepare to become OSHA certified by the end of their sophomore year.

GRADE 10 RELATED – COURSE #EC2R     5 CREDITS   Students gain knowledge of the needs of various ages and learn how to supervise young children. Students learn how to determine socially acceptable behavior and handle negative behaviors as well as the signs of child abuse and neglect. Furthermore, students become familiar with age appropriate curriculum planning and implementation, explore the value of play in the preschool setting and become involved in daily activities by extending play.

GRADE 11 SHOP – COURSE #EC3      25 CREDITS   Students plan, implement, and direct weekly thematic based units. Students also work on bulletin boards, children’s portfolios and end of the year preschool evaluations.

GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #EC3R      5 CREDITS    Students explore the field of early childhood education through understanding the traits of a quality child care program. They become aware of the characteristics that make up a competent child care professional and learn what is required to operate a child care center effectively. Furthermore, students learn how to set up an appropriate environment for children to learn and understand and implement health and safety practices.

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #EC4      25 CREDITS    In the Senior year, students put into practice their early education and care competencies by overseeing the preschool program.  Seniors, while supervised by their instructors, manage the daily activities of the preschoolers. If eligible, students participate in cooperative education programs in early childhood centers in the community. When students are eligible, they are able to work towards the Early Education and Care Infant/Toddler Teacher certification.

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #EC4R      5 CREDITS     Students spend senior year researching the state mandated child care regulations.

Our homes, the cars we drive, and the products we buy all begin with the art of drafting.  Drafting, known as the “language of industry”, is the process of drawing products through a graphic or picture language that can be understood by people worldwide.The Mechanical Design component of the program recognizes that today’s design tools differ from those of the past and offers students a program utilizing the latest 3-dimensional parametric modelers including “Solidworks.” Daily lectures teach the foundation of design principles. Then, students apply their knowledge to a curriculum-designed project that integrates real world applications. By the program’s completion, students are able to design a mechanical project, piece by piece, by creating 3D models of each component. The students will then assemble the parts and produce a “working drawing” of the model. The 3D model can then be emailed to a CNC (Computer Numerically Controlled) machine in our onsite manufacturing lab to be built as a prototype. This systematic approach walks the students through the entire experience of design from concept to prototype and introduces the different roles that are integral to product design.  The Electro-Mechanical Drafting components of the program prepare students to understand the drawing procedures from schematic diagram to PC board. Students will learn to recognize basic electronic symbols and draw schematic diagrams using CAD (Computer Aided Design) programs.  The Architectural Drafting component of the program prepares technical drawings for residential and commercial projects. Their drawings and models provide visual guidelines, details and specific dimensions for the construction industry. A major part of the curriculum uses the latest parametric 3D design software to produce drawing plans, elevation, sections, and details. The curriculum also includes architectural styles and history, structural theories, code research, sketching, presentation drawings, and model building.

     Sample Job Titles: 

  • Architectural Drafter
  • Mechanical Drafter
  • CADD (Computer-Aided Design) Drafter
  • Civil Drafting Technician
  • Commercial Drafter
  • Electronics/Electrical Drafter
  • 3D Printing Technician
  • Digital Manufacturing Technician

    Technical and Higher Education Majors
    Architecture and related Services
  • Engineering Technology
  • Drafting and Design Technology
  • Civil Drafting
  • Civil Engineering
  • Interior Design
  • 3D Printing

        College and University Programs:

  • Boston University                                            Northeastern University
  • Wentworth Institute of Technology             Boston Architectural Center
  • Fitchburg State University                             UMASS Boston
  • North Shore Community College                  Bunker Hill Community College
  •  Middlesex Community College                     New England Institute of Technology

 Certifications and Career Advancement:  The American Design Drafting Association (ADDA) has established a certification program for drafters. Individuals who wish to become certified must pass the Drafter Certification Test, administered periodically at ADDA-authorized sites. Applicants are tested on basic drafting concepts, such as geometric construction, working drawings, and architectural terms and standards.   Entry-level or junior drafters usually do routine work under close supervision. After gaining experience, they may become intermediate drafters and progress to more difficult work with less supervision. Drafters may eventually advance to senior drafter, designer, or supervisor.  With appropriate college degrees, drafters may go on to become engineering technicians, engineers, or architects.   Architects must graduate with a degree accredited by the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB), complete the Intern Development Program (IDP), and pass exams given by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB).

 CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA

Industry Certifications available in High School:  OSHA 10 Hour General Industry 

 College Credits toward post-secondard certifications/degrees can be earned through Articulation Agreements with:

College Course
Ben Franklin Institute of Tech. AR100/AR110 Architectural Graphics/Intro to CAD  7 cr.
 MA State Agreement w/MAVA/North Shore CC Intro to Drafting and Intro to CAD  3 cr.
New England Institute of Tech. ABT112 Technical Drafting and Graphic Comm  3 cr.
ABT114 Introduction to CAD - 4 cr.
ABT 115 Introduction to Structures - 2 cr.
Middlesex Community College CAD 115 - Intro to CAD - 3 cr.

DRAFTING AND DESIGN:  COURSE OF STUDY

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY – COURSE #DDX    1.4 CREDITS ​The CAD design exploratory program introduces the students to today’s cutting edge design process. Students begin their week long experience with a design challenge.  Students design their own invention in a 3D mode which will be animated and tested for correct fit. When the animation is correct, students make working drawings with proper views and dimensions.

GRADE 9 SHOP – COURSE #DDXF-16    4 CREDITS  Students learn about drafting shop tools that are used in the professional drafting and design “shop” environment.  Emphasis is on basic drafting practices and principles. Daily lessons incorporate examples of using parametric CAD programs that 21st century professionals use to design the homes and products that we use today. The students experience the theories of drafting methods through both individual and group assignments.

GRADE 10 SHOP – COURSE #DD2     20 CREDITS   This course meshes the time-tested fundamentals of mechanical design with today’s most advanced design tools. Lesson topics include Introduction to Design, Sketching and Freehand Technical Design, Basic Geometric Construction, Solid Part Modeling, Assembly Modeling, Orthographic Projection/ Creating Working Drawings, Measurement, Sectional Views, Auxiliary Views, Electronic Drafting and Introduction to Rapid Prototyping. All topics are covered in an easy to understand sequence and delivered in a way that builds knowledge and confidence.

GRADE 10 RELATED – COURSE #DD2R     5 CREDITS   The purpose of this course is to present the theories behind the common practices used in the mechanical design field.  This course explains the “why” behind the “how to” that are learned in shop. Lessons are carefully planned to align with shop lessons and reinforce concepts necessary to master the skills. Daily lectures are offered in a discussion format.

GRADE 11 SHOP – COURSE #DD3    25 CREDITS   The purpose of this course is to focus the Drafting and Design student on a variety of architectural projects. The students use Chief Architect software program to develop plans, elevations, sections and details on a variety of residential and commercial projects. Students are introduced to architectural theory, layout sketching, building materials, structural requirements, architectural components and building code regulations. Students will be introduced to the following topics: one and two story house design, stair layout, roof design, site design, kitchen and bath design, accessibility regulations and code analysis, commercial design projects. The students are required to develop and maintain a presentation portfolio with all weekly projects including sketches, notes, CAD drawings and models.

GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #DD3R    5 CREDITS   The purpose of this course is to focus the Drafting and Design student on a variety of architectural concepts, theories and terminologies. The students are introduced to architectural theory, layout sketching, building materials, structural requirements, architectural components and building code regulations. Curriculum also includes one and two story house design, stair layout, roof design, site design, kitchen and bath design, accessibility regulations and code analysis, commercial design projects, plot plans, civil drafting concepts, surveying and mapping. Students are required to develop and maintain a journal complete with weekly assignments, handouts, sketches and notes.

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #DD4    25 CREDITS   During their senior year, drafting students work on a variety of school approved community projects, larger commercial projects and larger residential projects. Seniors work on developing and practicing competencies that were learned duringtheir junior year. The students are required to complete and present their Junior/Senior project having earlier chosen 

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #DD4R   5 CREDITS  The Grade 12 related course curriculum engages students in areas of the state competencies that they have not yet experienced while reinforcing previously learned fundamentals. Emphasis is also placed on skills essential for successful completion of the Junior/Senior Project.

Monday, 16 August 2010 18:36

Design & Visual Communications

Students with artistic drawing talent will develop essential art skills needed to work in the professional art field and prepare to enter any art college after graduation. They will focus on building a strong professional art portfolio. Students regularly participate in hands-on experiences exploring various art techniques and state-of-the-art computer programs used in art agencies today including: InDesign, Deamweaver, Illustrator and Photoshop. Design students are educated in a professional studio environment and develop 21st century work habits.

    Sample Job Titles:  

  • Animation Artist                                                *  Photographer
  • Artist/Graphic Designer                                   *  Videographer
  • Computer Animator                                         *  Screen Printer
  • Digital Artist/Illustrator/Retoucher                *  Web Page Designer/Artist
  • Graphic Artist                                                    *  Photoshop Artist
  • Multimedia Designer                                       *  Fashion Illustrator
  • Game Designer/Illustrator                              *   Tatoo Artist
  • Children's Book Illustrator                               

    Technical and Higher Education Majors: 
  • Fine Arts
  • Illustration
  • Design
  • Advertising

     College and University Programs:

  • The New England Institute of Art, Brookline, MA
  • Lesley University, Boston, MA
  • Montserrat College of Art, Beverly, MA
  • Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, MA
  • Fitchburg State University, Fitchburg, MA
  • Salem State University
  • North Shore Community College
  • Bunker Hill Community College

Certifications and Career Advancement:  Usually requires a four-year bachelor's degree. A minimum of two to four years of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for this occupation. Employees in this occupation usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training. Evidence of appropriate talent and skill, displayed in an artists portfolio, is an important factor used by art directors, clients, and others in deciding whether to hire an individual or contract for their work. A portfolio is a collection of handmade, computer-generated, photographic, or printed samples of the artists best work. Assembling a successful portfolio requires skills usually developed through postsecondary training in art or visual communications. Internships also provide excellent opportunities for artists to develop and enhance their portfolios.

 CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA

Industry Certifications available in High School:  OSHA 10 hour General Industry Certification

College Credits toward post-secondary certifications/degrees can be earned through Articulation Agreements with:

College Course
MA State DV Articulation Agreement One or more DV courses at a MA community college
Center For Digital Imaging Arts

Tuition Credit - $2,000

North Shore Community College                   GRA 116 Electronic Imaging    3 credits

                                                                                        GRA 118  Digital Page Layout   3 credits

DESIGN AND VISUAL :  COURSE OF STUDY

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY – COURSE #DVX        1.4 CREDITS   Students in this program will learn introductory knowledge of studio safety and basic Design and Visual communications projects.  Some of the projects the students will be expected to complete include; creating an advertisement and creating two pieces artwork for a children’s book.  They will also be exposed to basic photography and Photoshop techniques. 

GRADE 9 SHOP - COURSE #DVXF-16     4  CREDITS   Students begin to develop their artistic talents by completing a number of assignments using both freehand drawing and computer based programs such as InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop. Students will learn how to operate shop cameras, Canon 60D, in a manual setting.

GRADE 10 SHOP - COURSE #DV2        20 CREDITS   Students will develop a variety of art and design skills in their sophomore year.  Sketch books will be issued with specific quarterly assignments to promote critical visual problem solving skills.  Students study color theory through the use of watercolor, gouache, pastels, and prism color pencils and markers.  Typography and practical implementation of design theory, as well as digital and reflective illustrations allows the Design students to work on a variety of graphic design projects and train on up-to-date, industry relevant-software.  Students are introduced to preparing, maintaining, critiquing and editing their own professional artist portfolio. Students learn about exposure and become more familiar with a properly exposed image in Photography studies. Students learn the basics of Flash animation including, Tweens and Frame by frame. Students get an introduction to the use of our HP 3600 Indigo Press.

GRADE 10 RELATED - COURSE# DV2R     5 CREDITS    This course is the first of three related courses needed to complete the Design and Visual Communications competences and graduate with a certificate in the field.  Students will be introduced topics including but not limited to color theory, photography, digital art, desktop publishing, web design, animation, typography and painting. Students learn at an introductory level the use of our HP 3600 Indigo Press. 

GRADE 11 SHOP - COURSE# DV3      25 CREDITS    Students perform Ad Agency-based assignments such as: Corporate ID New Image Design Presentations, Product Ad Campaigns, TV Ad campaign / story boarding, Product Design presentations, and animated promotional Ads.  Comprehensive layout presentations and critical critiques are conducted as an important and real process tool to promote inventive, exciting work.  Digital photography and studio strobe lighting, along with, Photoshop, Illustrator and Flash animation Computer Programs are used by the art students to produce finished comprehensive presentations. Working hands on with our HP 3600 Indigo Press, creating posters, flyers, bound books, and brochures.

 GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #DV3R     5 CREDITS   This course is the second of three related courses needed to complete the Design and Visual Communications competences and graduate with a certificate in the field.  Students will continue their study of the following topics: color theory, photography, and digital art, desktop publishing, web design, animation, typography and painting. Students get much more experience with professional equipment such as Cintiq’s, Studio Lighting with Strobes, Working with HP 3600 Indigo Press.

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #DV4      25 CREDITS  Critical study in specific focus areas for portfolio refinement and final review is a requirement.  Students experience National Art Portfolio Day.  College visits are scheduled and financial aid information is disseminated.  Seniors write a college letter-of-intent-essay and design and produce a two-fold promotional mailer.  A resume, cover letter, and job search / interview strategy plan will be developed in the senior year. Students learn at an advanced level photography techniques such as high speed photography. Students work on advanced levels of Video Production, Flash animation, Fine Art and advanced presentation skills. Students work with the HP 3600 Indigo Press with operation and maintenance of the press. Students do live work for clients in and out of school.

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #DV4R     5 CREDITS    This course is the third of three related courses needed to complete the Design and Visual Communications competences and graduate with a certificate in the field.  Students will be become proficient about the following topics: color theory, photography, and digital art, desktop publishing, web design, animation, typography and painting.

 

Monday, 16 August 2010 18:33

Dental Assisting

Dental Assisting is one of the fastest growing careers in Massachusetts. The Northeast program offers a comprehensive curriculum aligned with the MA DESE Dental Assisting framework. Students are given the opportunity to gain knowledge of administrative and clinical dental procedures through academic and practical instruction. The students receive clinical experience at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. Upon successful completion of their rigorous curriculum, students are prepared to take the Dental Assisting National Board certification exams in radiology and infection control.

      Sample Job Titles:  

  • Dental Assistant
  • Orthodontic Assistant
  • Surgical Dental Assistant
  • Dental Products Sales Representative
  • Insurance Claims: Medical Records

    Technical and Higher Education Majors: 
  • Dental Hygienist
  • Dental Laboratory Technician 

        College and University Programs:

  •         Middlesex Community College
  •         Massachuetts School of Pharmacy
  •         Mount Ida College
  •         University of Connecticut at Bridgeport
  •         University of Massachuetts Boston
  •         University of New England
  •         Salem State College

Career Advancement:  Some dental assistants become office managers, dental-assisting instructors, dental product sales representatives, or insurance claims processors for dental insurance companies. Others go back to school to become dental hygienists. Dental Assisting is one of the fastest growing professions and for many is a rewarding life-long career.  Upon graduation from this Chapter 74 approved career-technical program, students are eligible to register with the Massachusetts Dental Society as a registered Dental Assistant.

Post-Grad Certifications:  Certification is available through the Dental Assisting National Board (DANB) and is recognized or required in more than 30 States. Certification is an acknowledgment of an assistant’s qualifications and professional competence.  Candidates qualify for the exam by having 2 years of full-time, or 4 years of part-time, experience as a dental assistant. In addition, applicants must have current certification in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

                                    CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION
Weekly externship at Tufts School of Dental Medicine while in Dental Assisting program at Northeast:  working with the undergraduate and postgraduate dental students includes:  clinical concentration: chairside dental assisting, radiology, patient preparation, and expanded functions and clerical concentration: introduction to dental office management. 
Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA
Industry Certifications Available in High School:  
  • American Heart Association:  BLS, CPR, AED Certification 
  • American Red Cross First Aid
  • OSHA 10 hour General Industry Certification
  • Dental Assistant National Board (DANB) Infection Control Certification (preparation for exam) 
  • Dental Assistant National Board (DANB) Radiology Certification (preparation for exam)
  • Massachusetts Registered Dental Assistant RDA (may register upon graduation)

DENTAL ASSISTING:  COURSE OF STUDY

Grade 9 Exploratory- COURSE# DAX      1.4 CREDITS​    Freshman students are introduced to the Dental Assistant profession. They are exposed to clinical and administrative duties of the
dental assistant. Dental career opportunities are explored. Skills include safety, clinical, clerical, and dental laboratory competencies. The freshman students study business math as it relates to operating a dental office. This daily class helps prepare the student for the MCAS exam. Students study the identification of teeth and nutrition as it relates to dental
health.

GRADE 9 SHOP- COURSE# DAXF-16     4 CREDITS   Students begin their dental assisting curriculum during the 4th quarter. Competencies include roles and responsibilities of
the dental assistant, introduction to dentistry, basic clerical and chair side procedures. Students complete the OSHA training program.

GRADE 10 SHOP- COURSE# DA2     20 CREDITS    Sophomore year the dental assisting student will learn both clinical and clerical skills. The clinical aspect is an introduction to infection control procedures, patient exam preparation, and basic operatory management. The clerical focus is on appointment book scheduling, inventory control, and insurance forms. Sophomore students participate in community service by providing Dental Health Education programs to Northeast’s Preschoolers.

GRADE 10 RELATED- COURSE# DA2R     5 CREDITS    Sophomore students study dental charting, oral anatomy, tooth morphology, tooth histology, tooth embryology and nutrition.

GRADE 11 SHOP- COURSE# DA3    25 CREDITS  Junior year the dental assisting student will focus on restorative materials, dental instruments used in general dentistry, as well as procedures and techniques used in today’s offices. Students are introduced to analog and digital radiology; competencies are developed in exposing, developing, and mounting x-rays. Three days a week students will experience an unpaid supervised externship at Tufts School of Dental Medicine. The students receive certification in American Heart Association CPR/AED and Red Cross First Aid.  Junior students participate in community service by providing Dental Education programs to local elementary school children.

GRADE 11 RELATED- COURSE# DA3R    5 CREDITS  Junior students study head and neck anatomy and the theory and safety practices of radiography.  Juniors also begin work on their Junior/Senior Project. 

GRADE 12 SHOP- COURSE# DA4   25 CREDITS   The senior year student concentrates on expanded functions, radiology health and safety and nutrition. Students are given lab practice and written assessments to prepare them for the national credential examinations. Senior year students continue their clinical experience three days per week at Tufts School of Dental Medicine. If eligible, students may participate in Cooperative Education. The administrative concentration is on writing, resume writing, and basic accounting procedures.

GRADE 12 RELATED- COURSE# DA4R    5 CREDITS   Senior students study all 9 dental specialties, medical/dental emergencies and pharmacology. Students complete and
present their Senior Project.

Monday, 16 August 2010 18:31

Culinary Arts

 Culinary Arts is the fastest growing industry in America today. Due to an ever-changing workplace and a newly defined global economy, the demand for highly skilled food service professionals is constantly increasing. Today’s customers possess sophisticated tastes and frequently connect food and business. Resorts and vacation areas are geared, year round, to meet the leisure needs of these business people. Institutional food service professionals are trained to feed the next generation from elementary schools through college.

Northeast’s Culinary Arts Program fully prepares students to make the choice of entering the workforce or continuing on to further education after high school. Each year of the Culinary Arts Program has a separate content concentration area focusing on three major components of the hospitality industry that is unique to the student’s year and grade. In the related classroom culinary students are taught the theory and science for that year’s content area. During Shop week, students and staff manage the “James Wallace Breakheart Inn”, an on site, full service restaurant, bakery, cafe open daily to the public for lunch.  Career technical pathways are full of postsecondary opportunities including but not limited to articulation agreements with select colleges enabling eligible students the opportunity to earn college credits while successfully completing Northeast Culinary courses. This is a tremendous jump start to a career and/or higher education. All Northeast Culinary Arts graduates are trained by professionals to be professionals. The students in the Culinary Arts program are working with the latest state-of-the-art equipment. Through the use of federal funding the district purchased a combination oven. This purchase provides the students with the opportunity to prepare multiple meals, simultaneously. This is the technology being utilized throughout the industry.

Sample Job Titles:

  • Baker
  • Bartender
  • Chef (Restaurant, Catering, Corporate)
  • Cook (Line, Prep)
  • Food Preparation Worker

Technical and Higher Education Majors: 

  • Culinary
  • Hotel and Restaurant Management

Certification and Career Advancement:  Advancement opportunities for chefs, cooks, and food preparation workers depend on their training, work experience, and ability to perform more responsible and sophisticated tasks. Many food preparation workers, for example, may move into line cook positions. Chefs and Cooks who demonstrate an eagerness to learn new cooking skills and to accept greater responsibility may also move up and be asked to train or supervise lesser skilled kitchen staff. Others may move to larger or more prestigious kitchens and restaurants.   Some chefs and cooks go into business as caterers or personal chefs or open their own restaurant. Others become instructors in culinary training programs. A number of cooks and chefs advance to executive chef positions or food service director positions, particularly in hotels, clubs, and larger restaurants.

  • Executive Chef                      * Director of Catering
  • Head Cook                             * Food Service Manager
  • Food Service Director          * Restaurant Manager/Owner

                           

                           CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION 

 Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA

 Industry Certifications available in High School:  National Restaurant Association ServSafe Certification (ServSafe)

 College Credits toward post-secondary certifications/degrees can be earned through Articulation Agreements with:

College: Articulated Course/Number Possible Credits What you earn
Johnson & Wales  Competency Exams  Required ($ charge)
CU 1345 Intro to Baking and Pastries 3 qc Tuition by Quarter Credits
CUL 1355 New World Cuisine 3 qc Tuition by Quarter Credits
CUL 1385 Fundamentals of Food Service Production 3 qc Tuition by Quarter Credits
North Shore Community College    
CF 101 Basic Culinary Techniques 2 Tuition Credits
CF 104 Intro. Breads Pastries and Desserts 2 Tuition Credits
CF 118 Stocks, Soups and Sauces 2 Tuition Credits
Newbury College    
CU 104 Breads and Rolls 3 Tuition Credits
CU 100 Culinary Concepts & World Flavors 3 Tuition Credits
CU 299 or 290  Culinary Arts Internship 3 Tuition Credits
Culinary Institute of America Food Safety (ServSafe) 1.5 credits   Challenge test: Mathematics 1.5 credits
New England Culinary Institute   $1,000.00 Scholarship

MA State CU Articulation Agreement

One or more CUL courses at a MA community college

CULINARY ARTS:  COURSE OF STUDY

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY – COURSE #CUX    1.4 CREDITS    The exploratory program introduces students to dining room services and back of the house production including bakery
production, kitchen production, sanitation and safety.

GRADE 9 SHOP – COURSE #CUXF-16       4 CREDITS   Freshman students execute all the dining room duties while in shop. Students are exposed to all aspects of table service
and use of a “Point of Sale” electronic system. Students experience weekly shifts in the kitchen and bakery to acquire the basics of back of the house production. Sanitation, safety, and basic rules and regulations of the industry are also covered.

GRADE 10 SHOP – COURSE #CU2    20 CREDITS   Curriculum for the Grade 10 students addresses the front of the house with students developing basic kitchen and bakery
skills. Content includes customer service, table service, cashier service protocols, using “Point of Sale” electronic system,  sanitation and safety procedures, host duties, kitchen and bakery utilities services, cold food production, basic culinary skills, cookies and roll production and basic bakery skills. Students also work towards their national ServSafe sanitation
certification.

GRADE 10 RELATED- COURSE #CU2R    5 CREDITS    Grade 10 related students will learn career terminology, kitchen safety, tools and equipment, food items, cooking methods
and techniques, basic nutrition and culinary related math and science. Sanitation laws and procedures, health and safety, utility and dining room service topics will be reinforced.

GRADE 11 SHOP – COURSE #CU3    25 CREDITS    Grade 11 students will be concentrating on cooking and baking throughout the year. Topics will include cooking methods,
fruits and vegetables, grains, legumes and starches, marinades, salads and dressings, thickening agents, soups and sauces, cookie production, quick breads, yeast dough, pie production, bakery scaling and basic bench working techniques.

GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #CU3R    5 CREDITS   Grade 11 shop themes are reinforced during the related course. Cooking methods, fruit and vegetable identification,
grains, starches, soups, stocks, salads and dressings, and baking fundamentals are emphasized. Culinary related math and science skills are developed. Related students will also begin to address their Junior/Senior project requirements.

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #CU4    25 CREDITS    Grade 12 students will be concentrating on cooking and baking as well as front of the house management techniques.
Content area includes advanced cooking and baking skills, merchandising, store management, buffet presentations, meatand seafood fabrication and dining room management. Grade 12 students maintain responsibility for food inventory, ordering, receiving and inspection procedures.

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #CU4R    5 CREDITS   Students will be introduced to meat and seafood identification, meat grading and fabrication, menu planning and design,
food ordering procedures, pastry and cake production, management controls and procedures, and advanced culinary related math and science. The Junior/Senior project will be completed.

Monday, 16 August 2010 18:29

Cosmetology

Cosmetology students receive comprehensive training in all areas of hairdressing and the related fields needed to qualify for both the state licensing examination and employment as a cosmetologist. Students also learn business management. Curriculum includes inventory control, record keeping and salon based technology, personal hygiene and good grooming, bacteriology, sterilization and sanitation. Anatomy and physiology play an important part in the program.

Becoming a COSMETOLOGIST
• Graduate from an accredited school and • Pass the Cosmetology State  Board Exam.
Becoming a BARBER (post High School licensing)
• 1000 hours of schooling in a state-licensed facility, 2 years of on-the-job training and/or school experience.
• If trained by a Massachusetts Barber School, an apprentice Barber may apply to sit for the Master License after holding the apprentice license for 18 months.

Sample Job Titles:

  • Hairdresser                                          * Hairstylist
  • Cosmetologist                                     * Makeup Artist
  • Nail Technician                                   * Hair Colorist
  • Aesthetician                                         * Manicurist

Certification and Career Advancement:  Advancement usually takes the form of higher earnings as barbers and cosmetologists gain experience and build a steady clientele. Some barbers and cosmetologists manage salons, lease booth space in salons, or open their own salons after several years of experience. Others teach in barber or cosmetology schools or provide training through vocational schools. Still others advance to become sales representatives, image or fashion consultants, or examiners for State licensing boards.

CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Licenses:  

  • Registered Cosmetologist                                   * Registered Aesthetician I
  • Registered Operator                                            * Registered Aesthetician II
  • Registered Manicurist                                         * Aesthetician Instructor
  • Registered Instructor                                           * Registered Demonstrator
  • Registered Demonstrator
  • Cosmetology Salon, Booth Shop, Manicuring Shop

Technical and Higher Education Majors: 

  • Make-up Artist Specialist
  • Cosmetic Chemistry
  • Trichology
  • Business/Marketing
  • Business/Entrepreneurship:  Salon Manager

Cosmetology graduates have been empoyed by the following companies:

  • Dellaria’s Salon, Boston                                                                Vidal Sassoon Salon, Boston
  • Phillip Ciampa, Lexington,Winchester & Wakefield               James Joseph Salon, Boston 
  • Laschi's, Reading                                                                            Jack and Jill Hair Salon, Lynn
  • Creative Expressions, Lexington                                                 Tangles Hair Salon, Saugus 
  • Skin for All Seasons, Revere

Apprentice/Licensing Connections:    

Division of Registration of Cosmetologists
1000 Washington St #710, Boston, MA 02118     (617) 727-9940

Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA, American Board of Certified Hair Colorists (ABCH)

Industry Certifications and License Option Available in High School:  

  • OSHA 10 hour General Industry Certification  
  •  Cosmetology State Board Exam

Tuition Credits toward post-secondary certifications can be earned through Articulation Agreements with: 

  •  Catherine Hinds Esthetics School, Woburn : 75 credit hours toward Aesthetics programs 
  •  Electrology Institute of New England:  80 credit hours toward Advanced Esthetic Program 
  •  Elizabeth Grady Esthetics School, Medford : 75 credit hours toward Aesthetics programs

 COSMETOLOGY :  COURSE OF STUDY

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY- COURSE# COS   1.4 CREDITS​ The Grade 9 Exploratory Program in Cosmetology introduces students to a variety of different aspects of the salon curriculum. Students also practice all safety procedures, including sterilization and sanitation precautions as shown by the instructor. The integration of academics and career technical curriculum includes daily writing assignments. While Exploratory students do not need to wear a uniform while in shop, they must dress appropriately for the Cosmetology Shop setting. Concepts of Exploratory include salon safety & sanitation, hair styling, makeup & career exploration.  We put an emphasis on employability skills that are relevant in all career areas.

GRADE 9 SHOP- COURSE# COSF-16  4 CREDITS The Freshman class will study the History of Cosmetology and Safety in the Salon which includes infection control and sanitation. Students will be introduced to beginning level hair, nails & makeup instruction, life skills & communication.

GRADE 10 SHOP- COURSE# CO2  20 CREDITS Grade 10 Cosmetology students will study the following competencies: Wet Hairstyling: Shampooing, conditioning, finger waving, roller sets, pin curl placement, braiding and comb outs; Thermal: Round brush styling, iron curling, special occasion styling, comb-outs; and haircutting; students will be introduced to basic haircutting skills; Skin care treatments & Hair Removal: Eyebrow shaping, waxing, manicuring, and make-up application. Students will also practice all safety procedures and sanitation precautions as shown by the instructor.

GRADE 10 RELATED - COURSE #CO2R   5 CREDITS Grade 10 Cosmetology Related students will study the following competencies: Cosmetology / The History and Opportunities, Life Skills, Professional Image, Facials, Communication, Infection Control, Properties of Hair and Scalp, Hair Design Principles, Shampooing, Rinsing and Conditioning, Braiding, Histology of Skin, Hair Removal, Facials, Makeup, Nail Structure, Manicuring, Anatomy/ Physiology. Materials Required​:​ Text book, work books, uniform and shop kit. Students must replace any materials missing from shop kits as needed.

GRADE 11 SHOP – COURSE #CO3   25 CREDITS Grade 11 students will study the following competencies: Salon Management, Thermal Hair Styling, Wet Styling, Blow Drying, Haircutting, Permanent Waving, Waxing, Advanced Skin Careand Intro to Basic Hair Coloring, Pedicuring, advanced Nail techniques, and Make-up. The students will practice all safety procedures, sterilization and sanitation precautions as shown by the instructor.

GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #CO3R   5 CREDITS Grade 11 Cosmetology Related students will study the following in theory and practical: Salon Management, Nails/Diseases/Disorders, Thermal Hair Styling, Skin/Diseases/Disorders, Hair Styling, Removing Unwanted Hair, Haircutting, Electricity, Permanent Waving, Chemistry, Facials, Anatomy/Physiology, and Color Theory. Materials Required​:​ Text book, work books, uniform and shop kit. Students must replace any materials missing from shop kits as needed

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #CO4   25 CREDITS Grade 12 Cosmetology students complete curriculum in preparation for the Massachusetts State Board Examination for their Operator's’ License. Successful licensing allows students opportunities to participate in the Cooperative Education Program (additional eligibility criteria apply). Senior Cosmetology students complete the following competencies: Salon Management; Chemical Hair Relaxing/ Reconstruction, Advanced Hair Coloring/ Special Effects, Color Analysis, Sanitation, Haircutting, Clinic/Salon Management, Client Procedure / Conduct, Anatomy/Physiology and Chemistry.

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #CO4R   5 CREDITS Grade 12 students are prepared to take the state board licensure exam. Advanced chemistry, anatomy & physiology, Advanced Hair Color are covered. Students also learn salon ready skills for retailing, and also soft skills such as communication & consultation skills are perfected. Senior cosmetology students practice advanced styling & chemical service skills. Authentic assessment is conducted through working on salon/ clinic clients.

Monday, 16 August 2010 18:27

Carpentry

The Northeast Carpentry Program is designed to instruct students in all types of house construction and remodeling. Students are involved in foundation layout work, house framing and exterior and interior finish carpentry work. The students work with a variety of building and finishing materials and become familiar with modern methods and styles of commercial and residential construction. Carpenters are the largest group of building trade workers. They usually have greater opportunities than most other construction workers to become general construction supervisors as they are involved with the entire construction process. Throughout the program, strong emphasis is placed on employment with a union shop or general contractor. An integral component of the Carpentry curriculum involves shop workstations allowing students to practice all phases of house construction. Students are instructed in the use of hand power tools, industrial woodworking machinery, and a variety of contractor power and battery operated tools. In the related (theory) courses, particular attention is paid to the knowledge of all materials used in the trade, the layout and calculation of dimensions, entry level framing, window and door installation, and blueprint reading.

     Sample Job Titles:  

  • Carpenters                                                               * Lathers and Drywallers
  • Millrights                                                                 * Cabinetmakers and Millworkers
  • Pile Drivers                                                              * Floor Layers
  • Residential Carpenters                                          * Roofer
  • Interior Systems Carpenters                                 * Vinyl Siding Installer

    Technical and Higher Education Majors: 
  • Construction Management
  • Building Construction Technology
  • Civil Engineering Technology
  • Construction Engineering Technology

     Carpentry graduates have been employd by the following companies: 

  • Cummings Properties, Woburn, MA                              Villandry Contracting Inc., Arlington, MA
  • Local Union #26, Wilmington, MA                                 Local Union #28, Medford, MA
  • Home Depot, Saugus, MA                                                 Aronis Builders, Stoneham, MA
  • Local Union # 33 Boston, MA                                          Griffin Interiors, Wilmington, MA
  • Tower Glass, Woburn, MA                                                Lowe's, Peabody, MA

Career Advancement:   
Independent Contractors, Carpentry Supervisors.  Carpenters usually have more opportunities than most other construction workers to become general construction supervisors because carpenters are exposed to the entire construction process. For those who would like to advance, it is increasingly important to be able to communicate in both English and Spanish in order to relay instructions and safety precautions to workers. Carpenters may advance to carpentry supervisor or general construction supervisor positions. Others may become independent contractors. Supervisors and contractors need good communication skills to deal with clients and subcontractors. They should be able to identify and estimate the quantity of materials needed to complete a job and accurately estimate how long a job will take to complete and what it will cost.

CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA

Industry Certifications available in High School:

OSHA 10 hour Construction, Safety & Health

MAVA : DAT Division of Apprenticeship Training: Carpentry Articulation Verification

APPRENTICESHIP CONNECTIONS:  toward post-secondary certifications earned through Articulation Agreements with:  

Boston Carpenters and Apprenticeship Training Fund, Brighton, MA  
Division of Apprenticeship Training, Boston, MA

Union/Apprenticeship Agreement if Accepted (Att., COPS, Math Prof)
MA State CA Articulation Agreement   
One or more CA courses at a MA community college
New England Carpenters Training Fund
Massachusetts Carpenters Appren & Training
Apprenticeship Training Co-op  (+ points on application score)  
Apprentices & Journeymen MA State Apprenticeship Program
 Construction Craft Laborers Appren Prog  Apprenticeship Programs
Boston Carpenters Apprenticeship & Training
Apprenticeship Programs

CARPENTRY : COURSE OF STUDY

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY – COURSE #CAX 1.4 CREDITS​ With primary focus on safety, students complete a week long exploratory program which includes an overview of the various trades within the construction field. Topics covered include: print reading, framing, drywall and finish, as well as the application of interior and exterior finish materials. Students are instructed in the safe practices involved in construction demolition, and organizational skills.

GRADE 9 SHOP – COURSE #CAXF-16 4 CREDITS​ Following shop selection, freshman Carpentry students are introduced to the basics of shop/worksite safety notably safe use of hand and portable power tools. Students complete small scale projects with emphasis on safety, measurement, layout, and basic construction math.

GRADE 10 SHOP – COURSE #CA2 20 CREDITS Students are introduced to the various hand, power, and industrial tools utilized in the shop and at job sites. All students complete the 10-hour OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) Construction Training Program. Carpentry students, enrolled in our competency program, receive actual hands on training involving construction techniques from the foundation to the roof. Students work in 2 person teams toward completion of a work station/mock-up addressing competencies in print reading and layout, framing, roofing, drywall installation, wall finishes, exterior siding, trim work, and floor finishes.

GRADE 10 RELATED – COURSE #CA2R 5 CREDITS Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of construction carpentry including; personal worksite safety, proper use and storage of hand and power tools and ongoing development of construction nomenclature, and relevant math concepts.

GRADE 11 SHOP – COURSE #CA3 25 CREDITS Students are re-instructed as to the various safety techniques and procedures, and must pass a safety orientation review test. The house building and remodeling programs are an integral component to the students’ overall development as a tradesperson. Strong emphasis is placed on the construction competency program as well as the importance of safety and teamwork.

GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #CA3R 5 CREDITS The purpose of this course is to further the students instruction in the principles of the carpentry construction field. The course is designed to furnish the technical background to the student’s experiences in the outside construction program. Initial work on the Junior/Senior project is also part of the curriculum.

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #CA4 25 CREDITS Students are re-instructed as to the various safety techniques and procedures and must pass the safety orientation test. There is a strong emphasis placed on the opportunity to participate in the school to work program. Students continue their house building and remodeling experiences with a strong emphasis placed on completing the competency program.

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #CA4R 5 CREDITS This course is designed to instruct students in the more advanced aspects of the carpentry construction field. Topics covered include advanced framing, job site safety and maintenance, estimating, site preparation, code requirements, purchasing/billing, job supervision and scheduling. Students also work towards completion of the narrative portion of the Senior Project.

Monday, 16 August 2010 18:24

Automotive Technology

The Automotive Technology department provides entry-level through advanced level learning and training in the design, theory of operation and servicing techniques of the many system components of today’s automobiles. Training focuses on engine repair, brakes, automatic/manual transmission/transaxles, suspension and steering, scan tools, lab scopes, test equipment, engine machine shop, heating and air conditioning, engine performance, emission controls, small engines, auto parts sales and shop safety. Northeast’s Automotive program is NATEF/ASE approved (National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation - National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence), and all teachers are ASE certified. The department supports the SKILLS USA program, a national nonprofit organization supporting students who are preparing for careers in trade, technical and skilled service occupations.

 Sample Job Titles:  

  • Automobile Service Advisor
  • Master Automotive Technician
  • Diesel Technician
  • Heavy Equipment Technician
  • Motorsports Technician 

     Technical and Higher Education Majors: 

  • Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians
  • Transmission Mechanic
  • Parts & Service Manager
  • Automotive Engineer
  • Automotive Restorer

Automotive Technology graduates have been employed at these local businesses:

  • 128 Mazda / Isuzu          Kelly Auto Group          Stoneham Ford            128 Ford
  • Olsen Cadillac                 Quality Volvo                  Liberty Chevrolet        Jiffy Lube
  • XL Hybrids                      Gem Auto Parts              NAPA Auto Parts         Flagship Motors
  • Danvers BMW 

Certification and Career Advancement:   ASE certification has become a standard credential for automotive service technicians. Certification is available in: electrical systems, engine repair, brake systems, suspension and steering, and heating and air-conditioning. For certification in each area, technicians must have at least 2 years of experience and pass the examination. Completion of an automotive training program in high school, vocational or trade school, or community or junior college may be substituted for 1 year of experience. For ASE certification as a Master Automobile Technician, technicians must be certified in all eight areas.  By becoming skilled in multiple auto repair services, technicians can increase their value to their employer and their pay.

CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA, National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF)

Industry Certifications available in High School:

  • OSHA 10 hour General Industry Certification
  • Valvoline Motor Oil Basic Certification
  • Snap-on Meter Certification
  • ASE Refrigerant Certification (ASER) 603
  • Mobile Air Conditioning (MACS) Certification (optional)

COLLEGE CREDITS  toward post-secondary certifications/degrees can be earned through Articulation Agreements with:

 MA State AT Articulation Agrmt

 

One or more AT courses at a MA community college

 Ben Franklin Institute of Tech.

 AT259 - Automotive Hybrid Safety and Technology

New England Institute of Tech.

TT105 Intro. To Transportation Technology - 2 credits

TT110 Basic Engine Theory - 3 credits
(Auto Tech and Marine Tech) TT111 Basic Engines Lab - 2 credits
TT112 Basic Electricity Fundamentals - 3 credits
TT113 Basic Electricity Fundamentals Lab - 2 credits

Universal Technical Institute

One-time tuition credit

AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY :  COURSE OF STUDY

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY – COURSE #ATX 1.4 CREDITS This one-week exploratory program introduces students to the automotive and associated service industries. Some of the topics covered are; personal and shop safety, principles of 4-stroke cycle engines, basic measuring skills, hand tools, vehicle maintenance, engine component identification, and disassembly and assembly. Students explore ASE career paths, such as an auto technician, parts supply specialist, machine technician, motorcycle technician, and marine technician. Students see a video on how a car is built from design to completion. Instructional delivery includes hands-on performance, computer animation, group activities, self-paced computer instruction and video presentations.

GRADE 9 SHOP – COURSE #ATXF-16 4 CREDITS Course content introduces students to Shop experiences that include: tire service, vehicle preventative maintenance, shop safety and safe operation of tools, career opportunities, basic engine construction and design. Hands on work include wheel and tire identification, inspection, repair, dismounting, mounting, balancing, and installation. In addition the identification and repair of disc/drum brake systems are covered. This part of the course will provide the students with the basic skills and knowledge necessary for continued success in the Automotive Technology program.

GRADE 10 SHOP – COURSE #AT2 20 CREDITS Course content introduces students to Shop experiences that include instruction and hands on training in wheel alignment fundamentals and service, steering and suspension geometry, steering/suspension fundamentals and service, automotive machine shop, basic electrical/electronic theory and operation, maintaining the engine electrical system, and servicing the automotive electrical/electronic system. Shop experiences will provide the students with the knowledge and skill training for continued success in the Automotive Technology program. Instructional delivery includes demonstrations, presentations, and hands-on performance testing.

GRADE 10 RELATED – COURSE #AT2R 5 CREDITS During Grade 10 related, students will investigate and participate in this course that provides students with the theory necessary to understand and troubleshoot basic automotive sub-systems. Coursework is designed to address NATEF objectives. Students receive instruction in tool use and safety, equipment procedures, lubrication, automotive machine shop, steering and suspension geometry, 4-wheel alignment, and introduction to braking systems. Students are also introduced to on-board computer theory and diagnostics. Instructional delivery includes presentations, reading and writing assignments, classroom demonstrations, self-paced computer instruction, electronic textbooks and visual media presentations. Reading, writing and math assignments related to the automotive profession are integrated with academic frameworks during this class.

GRADE 11 SHOP – COURSE #AT3 25 CREDITS Course content introduces students to Shop experiences that include instruction and hands on training in 4-stroke cycle engine operation, cooling system maintenance and service, automotive machine shop, exhaust system inspection and service, basic electricity/electronics, ignition systems, service and testing of emission control systems, starting and charging systems parts, inventory, and billing procedures, and instruction and use of the MITCHELL ON DEMAND catalog/repair CD ROM information system. Shop experiences will provide the students with knowledge and skill training for continued success in the Automotive Technology program. Instructional delivery includes demonstration, presentations and hands-on performance testing.

GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #AT3R 5 CREDITS During Grade 11 related, students will investigate and participate in this course that provides students with the theory necessary to understand and troubleshoot basic automotive sub-systems. Instruction builds on coursework from the previous year and is designed to address NATEF and MA CVTE frameworks objectives. Students receive instruction in the principles and operation of the 4-stroke cycle engine, cooling system operation and service, use of precision measuring tools in automotive machine shop, exhaust system operation, basic electricity/electronics, ignition systems, introduction to on-board diagnostics, starting and charging systems and instructions in the use of the MITCHELL ON DEMAND catalog/repair CD ROM information system. Instructional delivery includes presentations, demonstrations, and the use of multimedia equipment. Curriculum includes reading, writing, and math assignments consistent with the automotive profession. 45 AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY CONT.

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #AT4 25 CREDITS Course content introduces students to Shop experiences that include instruction and hands on training in service and repair of automotive sub- systems in the areas of heating and air conditioning, service and repair manuals, diagnosis and repair of clutch systems, differentials, and drive line components, principles and operation of manual/transaxle, principles and operations of automatic transmission/transaxle, fuel systems, emissions control, automotive machine shop, and the use of state of the art scan tools, lab scopes and test equipment. Students are also encouraged to learn about customer service skills. Instructional delivery includes presentations, demonstrations, and hands on performance testing, reading and writing assignments, shop demonstrations, and visual media presentations. Tests and performance evaluations are used to determine the student’s level of mastery.

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #AT4R 5 CREDITS During Grade 12 related, students will investigate and participate in lessons that build on coursework from the previous year and are designed to address NATEF objectives. Students receive instruction in the theory and operation of the fuel system, emissions control, diagnosis of on board computer systems, heating and air conditioning, automatic and manual transmission/transaxle, clutch systems, differentials and drive line components, and use of scan tools, lab scopes, and test equipment. Instructional delivery includes presentations, demonstrations, the use of multimedia equipment and electronic textbooks. Curriculum includes reading, writing, and math assignments consistent with the automotive profession.

Monday, 16 August 2010 18:19

Automotive Collision Repair & Refinishing

Thousands of vehicles are involved in collisions every day. Many of these cars and trucks need to be properly restored to pre-accident condition. This is the job of the automotive collision repair technician. You can learn the skills necessary to get started in this exciting and rewarding career at Northeast. The National Automotive Technician's Education Foundation (NATEF) certified, Automotive Collision Repair and Refinishing program at Northeast offers training in all aspects of automotive collision repair, based on ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) and Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision Repair (I-CAR) standards.  Upon successful completion of the program, students will possess the knowledge and hands-on experience needed to excel in the workplace or as a solid foundation toward a post-secondary degree. The Automotive Collision Repair and Refinishing program at Northeast has articulation agreements with area technical colleges for those students who wish to further their training after graduation. Student safety is a priority in the Automotive Collision Repair and Refinishing program. Shop facilities and training conform to OSHA standards and all students in the program receive the OSHA certified 10 Hour General Industry safety course.   FACILITIES:  GFS Water-borne and SprayBake Downdraft spray booths, Survivair fresh-air supplied respirator system, PPG computerized paint mixing system, Chief E-Z Liner frame machine, Chief universal frame measuring system, ADP ShopLink and Mitchell computerized auto damage estimating systems, heat inductor adhesive removal tool, mig and aluminum welders, Eagle II dent removal machine, plasma and oxy-acetylene cutting equipment. 

 Sample Job Titles:  

  • Automotive Body and Related Repairers
  • Insurance Appraisers
  • Auto Damage Estimator/Appraiser Claims Adjuster
  • Field Inspector/Appraiser
  • Painter/Refinisher Technician
  • Glass Technician

 Technical and Higher Education Majors: 

  • Mechanic and Repair Technologies/Technicians
  • Autobody/Collision and Repair Technology/Technician
  • Restoration, Frame Repair

Automotive Collision Repair and Refinishing graduates have been employed at these local businesses:

  •  Lannan Chevrolet, Woburn, MA European Auto Body, Revere, MA
  •  Woburn Imported Cars, Woburn, MA Expert Auto Body, Wakefield, MA
  •  Krazy Custom Cycles, Wilmington, MA Nickole Auto Body, Saugus, MA
  •  Precision Auto, Wakefield, MA Mahoney’s Auto Body, Woburn, MA
  •  Today’s Auto Collision Repair Center, Chelsea & Malden, MA

 Certification and Career Advancement:   Certification by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), although voluntary, is the pervasive industry credential for non entry-level automotive body repairers. This is especially true in large, urban areas. Repairers may take up to four ASE Master Collision Repair and Refinish Exams. Repairers who pass at least one exam and have 2 years of hands-on work experience earn ASE certification. The completion of a post-secondary program in automotive body repair may be substituted for 1 year of work experience. Those who pass all four exams become ASE Master Collision Repair and Refinish Technicians. Automotive body repairers must retake the examination at least every 5 years to retain their certification. Many vehicle manufacturers and paint manufacturers also have product certification programs that can advance a repairers career.

CONNECTIONS TO WORK AND HIGHER EDUCATION

Industry Affiliations:  SKILLS USA, National Automotive Technicans Education Foundation (NATEF)

Industry Certifications available in High School:

          OSHA 10 hour General Industry Certification

          Mobile Air Conditioning (MACS) Refrigerant Certification     

          I-CAR Platinum Individual Recognition Certification

College Credits toward post-secondary certifications/degrees can be earned through Articulation Agreements with:

Universal Technical Institute (UTI) :   Tuition Credit

 New England Institute of Technology (NEIT):  Tuition Credit for the following courses:

TT105 Intro. to Transportation Technology - 2 cr.      
AUB118 Welding for Collision Repair - 2 cr.          
AUB101 Fundmtls. Auto Body Metal Repair - 3 cr.      
AUB103 Fundmtls. Auto Body Metal Repair Lab - 2 cr.      
AUB137  Fundmtls Parts and Refinishing Equip - 2 cr.    
AUB138 Fund Parts and Refinishing Equip. Lab - 2 cr.

PREPARATION FOR MASSACHUSETTS EXAMINATION TO BECOME LICENSED AUTO DAMAGE APPRAISER: COURSE AVAILABLE THROUGH NE ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM: must be at least 18 years old with 2 years work experience in field.

AUTOMOTIVE COLLISION REPAIR & REFINISHING:  COURSE OF STUDY 

GRADE 9 EXPLORATORY – COURSE #ABX 1.4 CREDITS During grade 9 exploratory, students will receive instruction in auto body shop safety and basic auto body repair techniques. Course content introduces students to vehicle construction, minor dent repair, masking, automotive detailing and basic airbrushing skills.  

GRADE 9 SHOP – COURSE #ABXF-16 4 CREDITS​ During grade 9 shop, course content will include content on the safe and proper use of all hand and power tools used in the collision repair industry. Students will be introduced to basic automotive welding, and automotive refinishing procedures.  

GRADE 10 SHOP – COURSE #AB2 20 CREDITS During grade 10 shop, students will receive instruction on vehicle construction and nomenclature, computer estimating, sheet metal repair, advanced automotive welding, water-borne and solvent-based paint mixing, surface preparation and refinishing, non-structural body repair and plastic welding. 

GRADE 10 RELATED – COURSE #AB2R 5 CREDITS This course provides students with the theory necessary to understand the basic repair and refinishing techniques used in the collision repair and refinishing industry. Coursework is designed to address NATEF objectives. Students receive instruction in tool use and safety, vehicle construction and shop equipment procedures. Students will also attain their OSHA 10 hour general safety card as part of their instruction. Instructional delivery includes presentations, reading and writing assignments, classroom demonstrations, self-paced computer instruction and visual media presentations. Reading, writing and math assignments related to the collision repair industry are also integrated with the academic frameworks. 

GRADE 11 SHOP – COURSE #AB3 25 CREDITS During grade 11 shop, course content will focus on more advanced non-structural and structural damage while students hone their skills on live work and project vehicles. Instruction will include: damage analysis and measuring, body panel preparation, panel alignment, auto glass removal and installation and proper refinishing techniques. 

GRADE 11 RELATED – COURSE #AB3R 5 CREDITS This course provides students with the theory necessary to understand the basic repair and refinishing techniques at an advanced level of instruction used in the collision repair and refinishing industry. Instruction builds on coursework from the previous year and is designed to address NATEF objectives. Students receive instruction in automotive refinishing and equipment use and application, dent repair techniques and equipment and MIG welding. Instructional delivery includes presentations, reading and writing assignments, classroom demonstrations, self-paced computer instruction and visual media presentations. Reading, writing and math assignments related to the collision repair industry are also integrated with the academic frameworks. Introduction to the Jr./Sr. Project graduation requirement is also a component of their related instruction.  

GRADE 12 SHOP – COURSE #AB4 25 CREDITS During grade 12 shop, course content will include removing and replacing structural panels, identifying, measuring and straightening frame and unibody damage and diagnosing mechanical and electrical component problems. Instruction will also emphasize the development of desirable employability skills. 

GRADE 12 RELATED – COURSE #AB4R 5 CREDITS This course provides students with the theory necessary to understand the basic repair and refinishing techniques at an advanced level of instruction used in the collision repair and refinishing industry. Instruction builds on coursework from the previous year and is designed to address NATEF objectives. Students receive instruction in frame damage analysis, computer estimating and mechanical and electrical components. Instructional delivery includes presentations, reading and writing assignments, classroom demonstrations, self-paced computer instruction and visual media presentations. Reading, writing and math assignments related to the collision repair industry are also integrated into the curriculum as evidenced by continuation and completion of the Jr./Sr. Project graduation requirement.

Friday, 13 August 2010 15:07

Presentations

Section being revised.
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